Halloween Fever

Monday, October 17, 2005

My dad bought this monstrous 7' tall inflatable halloween zeplin. At night it lights up eerily, transforming my home into a wickedly evil haunted house. Suffice it to say that my young demon spawn reveres this lawn ornament . Every day she insists I attach the extension cord to the outlet and "blow up ta pumkin". As soon as the little motor whirs to life she sets off fast as she can and begins plucking soggy leaves from the idol which had accumulated from the night before. Then once the shrine is properly sanctified my daughter dances around like a tiny witch cackling and screaming in worship of her God. I cant wait till she discovers people are going to give her candy. I will of course be accompanying her icognito with a large back-up candy sack. A new halloween ritual for me and mine.

5 comments:

Zanitram said...

Hope she doesnt recruit my wee gaffer for her little cult. My child is informed that if there is a large in flated orange ball called 'ta pumkin' it will eat her. That should take care of it.

Carrie said...

love it. awesome...like father like daughter...as it shud be....halloween afterall is the night of the dead.

K-Prime said...

And then are you going to be the classic parent and tell her she can only have two pieces that night, then go through her stash after she goes to sleep and steal all the good stuff?

The Lazy Iguana said...

I feel sorry for children of parents who are overboard on the religion thing. Good for you for allowing your child to have a fun holiday!

Halloween is less about devils and witches and stuff than it is about fun and candy.

thedeviluno said...

The term "Halloween" derives from Hallowe'en, an old contraction, still retained in Scotland and some parts of Canada, of "All Hallow's Eve," so called as it is the day before the Catholic All Saints holy day, which used to be called "All Hallows," derived from All Hallowed Souls. In Ireland, the name was Hallow Eve and this name is still used by some older people. Halloween was formerly also sometimes called All Saints' Eve. The holiday was a day of religious festivities in various northern European pagan traditions, until it was appropriated by Christian missionaries (along with Christmas and Easter, two other traditional northern European pagan holidays) and given a Christian reinterpretation. In Mexico, All Saint's Day, following Halloween, is the Day of the Dead.